Glasgow Corporation Transport No. 22

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Glasgow 22

Photo: Jim Dignan

Glasgow 22 provides an interesting example of a traditional four wheeled tramcar, of which there are several at Crich.  Many of these (for example Chesterfield 7) were purchased ‘off the peg’ from established tramcar suppliers and received relatively little modification over the years.  Others, however, such as Glasgow 22, were built in-house by their operators and were often extensively modified over time, thereby acquiring a distinctive local ‘character’ that set them apart from those operated by other tramway undertakings.

glasgow-22-bob-parr-8-aug-1953

Glasgow 22. Bob Parr, 8/8/1953

As one of Britain’s largest tramcar operators, Glasgow Corporation had extensive workshops of its own and, over time, developed a series of tramcars that – because they shared a number of distinctive features – came to be known as ‘Standards’. The Glasgow ‘Standards’ constituted one of the most numerous and successful types of tramcar in the country, the 1,000 or so examples of which were exceeded only by London Transport’s E/1 design.

Although the design of Glasgow’s double deck Standards can be traced back to the origins of the system in 1898, the process involved an ongoing programme of modification and rebuilding, latterly (in Glasgow) to emulate improvements in the design of the bus fleets that provided a constant challenge for all tramway operators.

Specification

Type of tram
Double deck, open balcony, vestibuled four-wheel electric tramcar
Livery
Orange and cream with white route colour
Seating capacity
62 (24 down, 38 up)
Date built
1922
Manufacturer of body
Glasgow Corporation
Manufacturer of truck
Brill 21E type (manufactured by Brush)
Gauge
Original: 4’ 7¾” Current: 4’ 8½”
Motor
MV101DR 2 x 60 hp
Controller
DK CDB2
Current collector
Trolley Pole (Fixed head)
Modification

Modifications including enclosed ends, upholstered seating, air brakes and high speed motors on roller bearings.

Withdrawn from service

End of 1960

Subsequent history

It survived as a depot shunter at Maryhill depot

Restoration history

Largely restored to its original1922 condition, though retaining its final truck and motors. The original storm covers on the top of the stairs have not been refitted.
A substantial overhaul was carried out in the mid-1980s (completed by 18 April 1987) in preparation for service at the Glasgow Garden Festival in 1988.

Current status
Restored and operational. Commissioned for service as part of the operational fleet during the current season..
Date started operating at Crich
1964 for 21 years, then from 1989
Total mileage covered at Crich
36,346
Current location
Depots
Timeline
  • 1922 – 1960Fully operational on original tramway
  • 1960 – 1962Relegated to shunting duties
  • 1962 – 1964Undergoing restoration
  • 1964 – c1985Operational at Crich
  • c1985 – 1987Undergoing restoration
  • 1988 – 1988Operational at Glasgow Garden Festival
  • 1989 –On display at Crich

Crich Tramway Village is a brand name for the National Tramway Museum (Accredited with Arts Council England), solely owned and operated by The Tramway Museum Society, incorporated in England with liability by guarantee (no. 744229). Registered charity number 313615. Our ICO number is Z6700136.